Speaking in Parliament:

Written Questions:

Crime Prevention: Gangs (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much his Department plans to allocate to the Ending Gang Violence and Exploitation fund in (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20."

A: "We will continue to support local voluntary sector and community schemes through new rounds of the Ending Gang Violence and Exploitation (EGVE) Fund. We plan to allocate up to £300,000 in 2018-19 and in 2019-20. The EGVE Fund will be launched in the summer and further details will be available in due course.

We are continuing to provide funding for Young People’s Advocates in London, Manchester and Birmingham to work directly with gang-affected women and girls. We are also providing funding to Redthread to support the expansion of their youth violence intervention scheme in hospital emergency departments.

We will also be providing £1million for the Community Fund in both 2018/19 and 2019/20 to help communities tackle knife crime and £11million over the next two years through a new Early Intervention Youth Fund."

Crimes of Violence (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to figure 2 of the Serious Violence Strategy, published in April 2018, if he will publish the figures for (a) homicide, (b) firearms offences and (c) knife crime in each year for which figures are available from 1997-8."

A: Information on homicide, offences involving firearms and offences involving knives or sharp instruments is regularly published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and the Home Office.

The ONS publishes information on offences recorded by the police including homicides, in Table A4 in their quarterly publication Crime in England and Wales. Data from 2002 are available here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

Historical data for police recorded homicides are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/historical-crime-data

For the purposes of the Serious Violence Strategy, the homicide data excluded certain mass homicide incidents. These include the 172 homicides attributed to Harold Shipman by the Dame Janet Smith Shipman Inquiry (recorded in 2002/03), 52 homicide victims of the 7 July London bombings (2005/06), 96 homicide victims of Hillsborough (2016/17) and 22 homicide victims of the Manchester Arena bombing and 13 homicide victims of the London Bridge/Borough Market and Westminster attacks (year to September 2017).

The ONS also publishes offences involving firearms recorded by the police (excluding air weapons). Data are published on a comparable basis from 2002/03 and can be found in Table F2 available here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesotherrelatedtables

The Home Office started collecting statistics on the number of selected offences involving a knife or a sharp instrument recorded by the police in England and Wales on a comparable basis in 2008/09. These are published in Open Data Tables available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/701942/prc-knife-open-data-march2009-onwards-tables.ods.

Police: Biometrics (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of the 30 April 2018 to Question 138075, on Biometrics, how the Government plans to improve the independent oversight and the governance of police use of automated facial recognition software."

A: "The Government will create a Board including the three relevant regulators (the Biometrics Commissioner, Surveillance Camera Commissioner and Information Commissioner) and police representatives. It will facilitate open dialogue between regulators and police forces that are considering piloting such technology.

"The Board will also consider all aspects of public trust in the police’s use of this technology, bringing together ethical and privacy considerations."

Advocacy: Young People (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much his Department plans to allocate to funding for Young Peoples Advocates in (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20."

A: "We will continue to support the existing provision for Young People’s Advocates through Home Office funding of £475,000 pa in both 2018/19 and 2019/20, to provide support and advice to young people being exploited by gangs, especially if they have been victims, or are at risk, of sexual violence by gangs. In addition, we will explore whether the YPA model should be expanded to provide support in other areas.

The Home Office has also provided related funding support for:

Redthread, to support the expansion of their youth violence intervention scheme in hospital emergency departments outside London, starting with the Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham in February 2018 and Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham in July 2018.

16 local EGVE projects of over £280k, for activity delivered between October 2017 and March 2018, including: gang, knife and county lines awareness training for young people, practitioners and foster carers; community sports and arts provisions; mentoring programmes; and young peoples safeguarding workshops."

Crime Prevention: Finance (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much money his Department plans to allocate to (a) future knife crime media campaigns, (b) new local and regional reviews, (c) the test purchase prosecution fund, (d) support for interventions with vulnerable groups, (e) work on police testing kits in respect of corrosive substances, (f) a thematic inspection of police forces in respect of county lines and (g) preventative measures in respect of gang related material on social media (i) 2018-19 and (ii) 2019-20."

A: "The Serious Violence Strategy is supported by a total of £40 million of Home Office funding over two years to support specific initiatives set out in the strategy. We have already outlined how much funding will support the Early Intervention Youth Fund, the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre, the anti-knife crime Community Fund, the Young Peoples Advocates and the Ending Gang Violence and Exploitation Fund. Further details about the specific funding for the other initiatives will be announced in due course."

Airguns: Crime (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many offences involving an airgun were recorded by police in each year from 2010."

A: "The Office for National Statistics publishes offences recorded by the police involving an air weapon and time series data can be found in Table 2, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/offencesinvolvingtheuseofweaponsdatatables"

Knives: Crime (30 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her article in The Daily Telegraph of 7 April 2018, we are determined to tackle violent crime, and there are enough officers on the streets to do so, if she will publish the statistical data on which the levels of knife crime were cited."

A: "The Home Office publishes Open Data Tables on the number of selected offences involving a knife or a sharp instrument recorded by the police in England and Wales at the police force area level. The data are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-recorded-crime-open-data-tables

The police have the resources they need to do their important work. The police funding settlement for 2018/19 increases overall investment in policing by £460m, including over £280m from increased local funding through Council Tax. Decisions about the allocation of police resources and deployment of officers are for Chief Constables and democratically accountable PCCs. They are responsible for ensuring the needs of the local community are met. Many PCCs have set out their intention to use their additional funding to maintain or enhance front line policing."

Drugs: Crime (19 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of people susceptible to drug (a) use, (b) selling and (c) running as a result of (i) homelessness, (ii) exclusion from school and (iii) living in care."

A: "The latest data on homelessness, school exclusions and looked after children are available at the following links, respectively:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-homelessness

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2015-to-2016

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017"

Biometrics (25 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals for the regulation of the use of automated facial recognition software."

A: "Facial recognition software is a new and potentially valuable law enforcement tool in reducing crime and protecting the public. The Surveillance Camera Code of Practice already requires the use of facial recognition systems to be clearly justified and proportionate in meeting its stated purpose, and data protection legislation and the College of Policing’s Authorised Professional Practice governs the retention of facial images. The Government also plans to improve independent oversight and governance of police use of the technology."

Robbery (19 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of international comparators of rates of robbery since 2015."

A: "

On 9 April we published the Serious Violence Strategy. The strategy includes our analysis of the evidence and the trends and drivers of serious violent crime. The analysis showed that all of the countries examined had experienced a fall in robbery from 2008 to 2015 and, in common with England and Wales, half of them experienced a rise in robbery from 2015 to 2016. The strategy renews our ambition to go further, setting out a number of significant new proposals to tackle serious violent crime.

Recorded robbery

Change from 2008 to 2015

Change from 2015 to 2016

England & Wales

-37%

+10%

US

-26%

+1%

Scotland

-55%

+8%

Sweden

-5%

+1%

Canada

-32%

-2%

France

-2%

-5%

Germany

-11%

-4%

Australia

-46%

+5%

Denmark

-40%

+7%

Finland

-9%

+8%

Italy

-24%

-6%

Spain

-10%

-2%

Netherlands

-26%

-7%



Police: Productivity (19 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Written Statement of 19 April 2018 on Police Funding, HCWS626, if she will publish the results of the sample of eight forces on the productivity benefits of mobile working."

A: "Following a 2017 sample of eight forces, the Home Office estimated that if all forces could deliver the same one hour per officer per day of productivity benefits from mobile working as the best, this has the potential to free up the equivalent of 11,000 extra officers nationally to provide the proactive policing that committed police officers want to deliver. The Home Office has established a small team who are working with the police through 2018 to contact a wider audit of the level of opportunity from mobile working, identify which approaches work best, highlight best practice, and help forces and the Home Office take the right decisions to maximise the gains from the use of mobile digital working."

Police: Mental Health Services (19 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to roll out the National Police Welfare Service, and how long that roll-out is planned to take."

A: "The Government takes the issue of police welfare very seriously and has invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers.

In July 2017 the Home Secretary awarded £7.5 million from the Police Transformation Fund over 3 years to pilot and, if it is successful fund a dedicated national service to help provide enhanced welfare support to serving police officers and staff.

The timing of any roll out will, in part, depend upon the outcomes of the pilot, scheduled to be carried out over 2017/18 to 2018/19. The evaluation will form a key part of future decisions about the national service in 2019/20."

Police: Mental Health Services (19 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will publish the results of the National Police Welfare Service trial."

A: "The Government takes the issue of police welfare very seriously and has invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers.

In July 2017 the Home Secretary awarded £7.5 million from the Police Transformation Fund over 3 years to pilot and, if it is successful fund a dedicated national service to help provide enhanced welfare support to serving police officers and staff.

The timing of any roll out will, in part, depend upon the outcomes of the pilot, scheduled to be carried out over 2017/18 to 2018/19. The evaluation will form a key part of future decisions about the national service in 2019/20."

Slavery (13 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has conducted an assessment of the (a) performance and (b) effectiveness of the national modern slavery helpline."

A: "The Modern Slavery Helpline is run by the charity, Unseen and is completely independent of Government. Information about the number and types of calls received by the Modern Slavery Helpline can be found on the Unseen website www.modernslaveryhelpline.org/information/stats or by contacting Unseen directly on https://www.unseenuk.org/contact-us"

Slavery: Children (13 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals to the National Referral Mechanism for children aged under 18, had ticked criminal services (i.e. involved the commission of an offence by the victim) under section D of the referral form, in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2015-16."

A: "The National Crime Agency (NCA), publishes statistics on referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These statistics are published on a quarterly basis and the NCA have recently published the complete statistics for 2017. These statistics include the breakdown of referrals for children by nationality and primary exploitation type. Criminal Exploitation is recorded as a sub category of Labour Exploitation within the statistics and includes children found in cannabis farms, nail bars and those involved in ‘County Lines’ gang exploitation.

The 2017 Report is available via the following link:

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics/2017-nrm-statistics/884-nrm-annual-report-2017

Information detailed within section E of the NRM referral form is used to guide and inform the case worker as to the reasons for the referral, not to facilitate the case management of the referral. No detail is recorded within the NRM case management system of this data."

Slavery: Children (13 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals to the National Referral Mechanism for children aged under 18, had ticked yes for involvement in criminality highlighting involvement of adults under section E of the referral form in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2015-16."

A: "The National Crime Agency (NCA), publishes statistics on referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These statistics are published on a quarterly basis and the NCA have recently published the complete statistics for 2017. These statistics include the breakdown of referrals for children by nationality and primary exploitation type. Criminal Exploitation is recorded as a sub category of Labour Exploitation within the statistics and includes children found in cannabis farms, nail bars and those involved in ‘County Lines’ gang exploitation.

The 2017 Report is available via the following link:

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics/2017-nrm-statistics/884-nrm-annual-report-2017

Information detailed within section E of the NRM referral form is used to guide and inform the case worker as to the reasons for the referral, not to facilitate the case management of the referral. No detail is recorded within the NRM case management system of this data."

Slavery: Children (13 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals for children aged under 18 to the National Referral Mechanism had ticked the box suspicions for involvement in criminality highlighting involvement of adults under section E of the referral form in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2015-16."

A: "The National Crime Agency (NCA), publishes statistics on referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These statistics are published on a quarterly basis and the NCA have recently published the complete statistics for 2017. These statistics include the breakdown of referrals for children by nationality and primary exploitation type. Criminal Exploitation is recorded as a sub category of Labour Exploitation within the statistics and includes children found in cannabis farms, nail bars and those involved in ‘County Lines’ gang exploitation.

The 2017 Report is available via the following link:

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics/2017-nrm-statistics/884-nrm-annual-report-2017

Information detailed within section E of the NRM referral form is used to guide and inform the case worker as to the reasons for the referral, not to facilitate the case management of the referral. No detail is recorded within the NRM case management system of this data."

Slavery: Children (13 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many referrals for children aged under 18 to the National Referral Mechanism had ticked yes for going missing and being found in areas where they have no known links under section E of the referral form in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2016-17 and (c) 2015-16."

A: "The National Crime Agency (NCA), publishes statistics on referrals into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM). These statistics are published on a quarterly basis and the NCA have recently published the complete statistics for 2017. These statistics include the breakdown of referrals for children by nationality and primary exploitation type. Criminal Exploitation is recorded as a sub category of Labour Exploitation within the statistics and includes children found in cannabis farms, nail bars and those involved in ‘County Lines’ gang exploitation.

The 2017 Report is available via the following link:

http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics/2017-nrm-statistics/884-nrm-annual-report-2017

Information detailed within section E of the NRM referral form is used to guide and inform the case worker as to the reasons for the referral, not to facilitate the case management of the referral. No detail is recorded within the NRM case management system of this data."

Police: Finance (16 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Written Statement of 31 January 2018 on Police Funding, HCWS439, which refers to an increase in total investment in the police system of up to £450 million including £270 million from increases in the precept, for what reason the press release, entitled Serious Violence Strategy funding: rebuttals and clarifications, of 10 April 2018 refers to a comprehensive settlement that will increase police funding by £460 million for 2018-19 including £280 million drawn from increased precept contributions."

A: "My statement setting out the police funding settlement on 31 January estimated the increase in precept income for 2018/19 at around £270m. The estimate assumed that all Police & Crime Commissioners would use their precept flexibility and that Council Tax base would increase in line with forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility. On 28 March, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government published statistics on what Council Tax precept will actually raise this year. Based on MHCLG’s figures, we expect total precept income will increase by just over £280m with total investment increasing by around £460m in 2018/18. Updated force level funding increases are set out at the fact sheet available at https://homeofficemedia.blog.gov.uk/2018/03/29/factsheet-police-funding-for-2018-19-explained/."

Crime Prevention: Finance (16 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the press release of 9 April 2018, entitled Home Secretary launches serious violence strategy, which projects are to be allocated the £40 million of her Department's funding referred to; and how much each such project will receive."

A: "The Serious Violence Strategy commits £40m of Home Office funding to support delivery over two years (2018-19 and 2019-20). This includes £11m for the Early Intervention Youth Fund; £3.6m for the new National County Lines Co-ordination Centre; £1m each year for the (anti knife crime) Community Fund; and £500,000 to support Heroin and Crack Cocaine Action Areas. Further details on how the remainder of the funding will be used to support the commitments in the Strategy will be the subject of further announcements in due course. This will include further support to Redthread for its youth violence intervention work in hospitals, future knife crime media campaigns, new local and regional reviews, new rounds of the Ending Gang Violence and Exploitation Fund, funding for Young Peoples Advocates, the test purchase prosecution fund, support for interventions with vulnerable groups, work on police testing kits in respect of corrosive substances, a thematic inspection of police forces in respect of county lines, and preventative measures in respect of gang related material on social media."

Crimes of Violence: Disclosure of Information (16 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the news article entitled Amber Rudd denies seeing leaked Home Office violent crime report, published by The Guardian on Monday 9 April 2018, whether (a) the Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service (b) her special advisers and (c) special advisers to Ministers in her Department had seen the leaked report."

A: No answer received as of 09.05.18

Crimes of Violence: Disclosure of Information (16 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the news article entitled Amber Rudd denies seeing leaked Home Office violent crime report, published by the Guardian on Monday 9 April 2018, whether her private office viewed the leaked report mentioned in that article before publishing the Serious Violence Strategy."

A: No answer received as of 09.05.18

Crimes of Violence: Disclosure of Information (16 April 2018)

To: Home Office

Q: "To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department,with reference to the news article entitled Amber Rudd denies seeing leaked Home Office violent crime report, published by the Guardian on Monday 9 April 2018, for what reason analysis produced by the Home Office on the effect of the reduction in police resources on serious violence was omitted from the Serious Violence Strategy."

A: No answer received as of 09.05.18